Hoofdbeeld brasserie2050

ADE Green shares best practices to create a delicious dish within the limits of the earth

Thursday, 19 September 2019
When it comes to measuring the CO2-output of an event, food is often excluded. Perhaps because it is quite complex to quantify the impact of all the different meals served, with their big variety of ingredients. Luckily two start-ups have emerged that enable their caterers to measure and lower their CO2-impacts: Giant Leaps and CarbonAte.
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Following up on recent announcements about Pllek exploring the conscious side of music during ADE and ADE Pro 2019, we continue with ADE Green where they will take a closer look into the imprint of our meals.

Maartje Nelissen

Following up on recent announcements about Pllek exploring the conscious side of music during ADE and ADE Pro 2019, we continue with ADE Green where they will take a closer look into the imprint of our meals.

In ADE Green’s panel ‘Food Impact powered by Rabobank’, the panelists will talk about their insights and the next steps that need to be taken in order to offer food to our audiences within the means of the planet. Prior to this, ADE Green interviewed an expert on this subject. Maartje Nelissen is the co-owner of The Food Line-up and shares her learnings and challenges regarding the CO2-impact of their dishes, which were served in the Brasserie 2050 - a collaboration between Rabobank and Lowlands Festival.


What can you tell us about the Brasserie 2050?
In 2050 the population is estimated to have grown to 10 billion people. In the face of climate change, that leaves humanity with a tremendous challenge: How are we going to feed everyone, within the means of our finite planet? This is only possible if we change how we grow, produce and consume our food. At Lowlands Festival, Brasserie 2050 served possible solutions, literally. Every dish on the menu was linked to a global food-related challenge, like biodiversity, climate change and zero waste. We measured the CO2-impact of every dish, compared it to the traditional version of the dish and put it in the perspective of the One Planet Plate concept. We served these dishes from a sustainably produced and completely reusable barn. It featured a high-tech vertical garden, tables from recycled plastic and compostable waste system. Its inviting design let everyone join in for a communal meal and a chat about the future. After all, food connects us all.


What’s this One Planet Plate concept you speak of?
Keeping in mind that our global food system accounts for 20% of all CO2 emissions, then what would be the CO2 impact limit for one dish? Together with researchers, the Swedish WWF have calculated how much greenhouse gases a meal may emit in order for us to limit global temperature rise below 2 degrees and feed all world citizens. The outcome is 0.4 KG CO2 for breakfast and 0.5 KG CO2 for lunch or dinner. This concept is called One Planet Plate. It is a clear way to make people aware of what their daily CO2 budget for food is and how far over they actually are. Sadly, the reality at the moment is that most people are over that budget every single day.


What do you envision in ten year’s time, what does the festival menu look like?
I really hope that the exception has become the standard. Consider the radical change of just this small step: A menu that indicates which dishes are non-vegan, instead of the other way around. Furthermore, I hope we have regained our pride in local farming and that local food systems connect to their waste streams for an increase in circularity. Fortunately, we see an increasing number of festivals and caterers that are eager to make a difference. 2014 was the first year a major Belgium festival switched to a 100% vegetarian menu, and others followed. That’s a fantastic step forward, but it’s still important to have a critical look at what’s still on the menu and why. For example, replacing a chicken dish by a version with buffalo mozzarella will only result in more emissions. We’ve found that you can make the biggest change by starting with issues that are close to your heart. Are you most worried about the climate, like we are? Then start with reducing your CO2-emissions and focus on local ingredients.

ADE Green
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Read the full interview here and find out more about:
• How The Food Line-up calculated the CO2-impacts of all the dishes that were served
• What’s the easiest way to lower the C02-impact of a dish.

Besides Lowlands (NL), Roskilde (DK) and Shambala (UK) also experimented this year with apps to calculate the carbon footprint of the festival dishes and challenged themselves to create dishes with a lower CO2 impact and and found inventive ways to communicate this towards their audiences. In the panel “Food Impact powered by Rabobank” at ADE Green the best-practices will be showcased.

20190815 Brasserie 2050 FLU 107

Read the full interview here and find out more about:
• How The Food Line-up calculated the CO2-impacts of all the dishes that were served
• What’s the easiest way to lower the C02-impact of a dish.

Besides Lowlands (NL), Roskilde (DK) and Shambala (UK) also experimented this year with apps to calculate the carbon footprint of the festival dishes and challenged themselves to create dishes with a lower CO2 impact and and found inventive ways to communicate this towards their audiences. In the panel “Food Impact powered by Rabobank” at ADE Green the best-practices will be showcased.

About ADE Green

ADE Green is the pioneering conference on sustainability, innovation and social change in the music industry and takes place on Friday October 18th at the DeLaMar Theater.

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